Round Shields

orcbane

Newbie
My (possible) alternate character I'm making is looking for a round, viking-inspired shield. With any luck some way to attach and throw it over my back for travel (using a clasp system of some sort?).

Either I'm looking for advice on making one or someone who has a bit of experience to do it for me! If you have an offer, information or any questions, quotes or confirmation... feel free to PM me or reply.

Thanks for reading,
Andrew
 

Far

Newbie
My character uses a round shield that can be slung over my back.

My shield was made using a round sled with pipe-foam secured around the rim. The handle is actual a trowel which is bolted to the inside of the shield, and a strap of leather for my arm, likewise bolted down. To secure the shield on my back, I use a long, and wide leather strap attached at opposite ends of the shield edge. This allows the shield to be slung over the shoulder when not in use.

For a more viking styled flat shield, my brother made a very similar shield using several pieces of foam board cut into circles and glued together. (Make sure that the grain of the alternating layers are perpendicular to each-other for strength) then he attached the pipe-foam to the rim by actually tying it down with rope threaded through holes all about the rim. This provides an interesting decorative effect. A rope attached rim to rim allows the shield to be slung over the back, and a center placed handle allow the lighter shield to be held directly in front of him or in any other position.

Good luck, feel free to ask questions if you don't understand any of my description
 

Wraith

Newbie
My only caveat would be to note that shield straps are often frowned upon for the same reasons we do not allow strings on bows and crossbows. They are one more thing that can accidentally tangle a weapon or trip someone if stepped on. Check with your local marshals before investing any major money.
 

Far

Newbie
The way to avoid that issue is to have the shoulder-strap be fairly tight, going from shield edge to shield edge with just enough slack that your body can fit in between strap and shield. If it is positioned so it is attached directly above and below the arm strap and handle, then when holding the shield it can be pushed forward, the arm slid through the arm-strap to grip the handle, trapping the shoulder-strap against the shield. In this way there is no chance of entangling a weapon. (You'd have to make a really weird strap setup to risk tripping someone)
 

Wraith

Newbie
It's more of a problem when the shield is lying on the ground, due to someone having been disarmed or killed. ;)
 

Far

Newbie
Well jeez, what are you wishing upon Andrew?? That he's going to be disarmed and killed!!?? :D

No, it really isn't an issue though, believe me, if you do it as I described the strap really never exceeds the footprint of the actual shield, so sure someone could get caught or trip on it, but to do so they would have to step squarely on the middle of your shield, in which case they may trip anyways, or break your shield, etc.
 

robc2775

Newbie
I'm new to this forum, but I've been a heavy weapons fighter in the SCA for over 10 years, so I know a bit about shields (Please don't hold the SCA thing against me). If I may, let me suggest using a u-shaped garage door handle for the hand grip on the shield. I've used this on many shields I have made for myself and others. It will provide a bit more stability than a bolted on trowel as it is attached to the shield at both ends, as opposed to just one end. It should be attached with short 1/4" bolts at either end. Don't forget the ring and lock washers either. The more flimsy the material you are using, the larger the washers should be.

As for making a shield strap for carrying it on your back, why not try mounting two small eye-bolts, top and bottom of the shield? You could then fabricate a leather strap with a dog-collar style clip on either end to attach to the eye-bolts. As you're going into combat, you take the shield off your back, quickly disconnect the strap to prevent a hazard, and shield-up. Just my two cents. Hope this helps.

-Robert
 
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