Should Flurry be a national rule or a local rule?

Should Flurry exist at the standardized level or the LCO level?


  • Total voters
    92

Paladin of Flame

Artisan
Moderator
Greetings,

Please keep conversations on-topic, polite and respectful. We've been getting a little off-topic with some of the posts. We will be monitoring these discussions more closely.

Thanks for understanding and happy posting!
 
It isn't just Calgary that currently uses a flurry rule. NH started using it last year, and it seems to work fairly well for us. Combat still flows quickly, and I don't feel that it slows anything down more than the mini holds that would previously occur to clarify calls and damage.
 

Fade

Newbie
I voted for LCO. Ive fought for many years on snow and ice and I simply don't buy that as a valid reason. I have tried out other laps that use a similar flurry rule as a general idea to slow down combat, and I'm not interested in it. If your chapter likes it, more power to you. Don't force it as a national rule.
 

Agnar

Newbie
I am curious whether everyone is interpreting the Flurry rule the same way.

I played Nero/Alliance, no Flurry, rule for almost a decade then played an Enteraction/Accellerant game with the Flurry rule (that is actually the system that originated the rule as far as I know).
I have continued to use the Flurry rule for myself in every game I play even if it's not part of the rules. I have played more than one system with the same Flurry rule.

They way it should work is:
Damage, damage, damage, PAUSE, damage, damage, damage, PAUSE, etc

Instead of:
Damage, damage, damage, damage, damage, damage, damage, damage, etc

So you are really only losing one swing of damage in every four.
Is this how it's being play tested or it being played as more restrictive.
There's a mention of "resetting stance". What is that being interpreted as?
 

MondayMcGee

Scholar
San Francisco Staff
I'm certain that we are not all interpreting it the same way. The rule as written is pretty vague (requiring a pause with no duration specified, asking us to reset combat stance if appropriate without describing what constitutes a stance reset or what makes it appropriate). I've seen attempts to clarify in this thread and others, but if anything, I've personally found them more confusing. At our last playtest, we just picked our best guess interpretation and used that, but I have no idea if what we tested is what is actually intended to be the rule.
 

Muir

Fighter
I'm certain that we are not all interpreting it the same way. The rule as written is pretty vague (requiring a pause with no duration specified, asking us to reset combat stance if appropriate without describing what constitutes a stance reset or what makes it appropriate). I've seen attempts to clarify in this thread and others, but if anything, I've personally found them more confusing. At our last playtest, we just picked our best guess interpretation and used that, but I have no idea if what we tested is what is actually intended to be the rule.
It's the same annoyance I've found with the rules on what constitutes a legal strike. A good diagram or video would make all the difference, or a more systematic training of marshals to ensure even rules interpretation.
 

Agnar

Newbie
Here's the Accellerant rule text which I think is alot clearer than the Alliance text (which needs to be clarified)
, so maybe it will clear things up a bit.

"A flurry is a series of melee swings
delivered at an enemy in combat with little or no pause. You can make no more than three consecutive attacks against a particular enemy where your weapon contacts an opponent or their weapons, including their shield, before you must reset. To reset your flurry you must step out of weapon range between you and your opponent and stop all attacks on your previous target for at least a second.
Players pursuing enemies need not interrupt pursuit by stepping back to reset their Flurry. The pursuer needs only to pause for a second while at a distance just within their maximum weapon range.
That's all you need to remember, everything else are clarifications and answers for specific questions.
• Blocked swings that contact a weapon or shield and successful hits that contact the body are counted as flurry swings. Feints and swings that do not make contact against weapons, shield, or body do not count as a flurry swing. You must reset your flurry after you have made three swings with contact before resuming attacks on that opponent.
• An opponent can't try to prevent you from resetting your flurry by advancing. If you have retreated in an attempt to get out of weapon range but your opponent's advance has prevented you from doing so then you may reset your flurry after a full second pause.
• Incidental weapon contact and
aggressively engaging an opponent's
weapon with beat attacks or offensive
parries can make flurry determination
confusing. We realize it is difficult to
determine if these types of weapon
maneuvers count as a strike in a flurry. As a Rule of Etiquette, if both your elbow and the weapon tip move forward and contact an opponent's weapon then count that as one of your flurry strikes even if it was not your intention to launch an attack. This might mean that both combatants use up a Flurry swing during incidental weapon contact."
 

Tantarus

Squire
Now that is a well defined rule for flurry. The current rule for 0.9 is far vaguer despite repeated attempts at clarifications.
 
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