That Orc Look

twilsemail

Artisan
I'm looking to bring in an orc PC to the next HQ game. While I sort out my costume and preferred method of greening myself, I'm wondering if anyone (orc player or otherwise) has pictures of orcs kitted out at game that they're willing to share.

What do people generally see on a high orc at game?

What do people expect/want to see on a high orc at game?

Are prosthetics (other than tusks) usually a part of the costume? Are orcs round eared or pointed?

I've probably got a million more questions, but I'm trying to regulate myself a bit.

I imagine a blanket answer is that they differ from game to game and possibly clan to clan, but it's at least worth asking.
 

Dom

Scout
Gettysburg Staff
Orcs are green with tusks. Tusks should be the only prosthetic you need. As far as clothing, that will differ from chapter to chapter. Decide whichever chapter you would like your Orc to hail from and get a hold of their race packet for Orcs.
 

twilsemail

Artisan
I've got my costuming under way. I'm just waiting on rivets to arrive at this point.

I'm working on tusks and trying out various methods of greening myself up.

I've got a handful of racial packets and have sorted out a background, at least on my end. I'm still waiting on staff to get back to me on some fiddley bits.

I'm mostly wondering if the "Green and tusks" bit of the description is a minimum or a confined standard. Most games seem to present that as a minimum, but don't really go beyond it as far as possibilities go.

I'm still wondering if anyone has pics of orcs in the game to show off. The only alliance orcs I've been able to find thus far are the real girls of gaming from Crossroads.
 

twilsemail

Artisan
Thanks Robb. I'd missed the Facebook albums.
 

Robb G

Baron
and that's just the HQ photo albums. There are plenty of other ones on the various other chapter facebooks and websites. :thumbsup:
 

Tyson

Scholar
Gettysburg Staff
Orcs!

It's been a while, but for greening up I think Mehron Starblend is still the makeup of choice. Unless you airbrush.

Under Armor shirts are pretty popular for repping skin, especially on the arms. You won't get the colors to match up between face paint and the fabric, so you'll want something to break up the boundary from sleeve to skin. Gloves are nice so you don't have to put paint on your hands (and I think most would prefer if you didn't if you're going to be making/serving food.) Fingerless gloves with unpainted fingers is fine; it's worth losing the green on your fingers to avoid gaining the green on everything you touch. :)

Tusks can be tricky, but nothing I've used beats Friendly Plastic. I prefer the flat strips over the pellets, personally. I tried without success to attach friendly plastic to my bottom jaw boil-and-bite mouthguard, but I'm not giving up on the idea yet. Maybe a different material, and/or some adhesive that's safe to have in your mouth.

If you have any other questions about orcs (in HQ or in general) or making tusks, please feel free to ask here or PM me.
 

phedre

Squire
A comfort tip for tusks:

Make the two sides two separate pieces. (Make the excess go back onto your premolars.)

There is much less rub on your gums that way (I've seen people spit blood because the prosthetic rubbed the gum so much on the bottom front teeth).
 

Dom

Scout
Gettysburg Staff
I used friendly plastic tusks at my first PC event as an Ogre and will remember the pain in my jaw after 2 days of wearing them for years to come. Maybe I'm just bad at making them or something but I had to find an alternative. I looked around online and found these right here: http://www.medievalcollectibles.com/p-5969-orc-teeth.aspx

buying them was probably the best choice I could have made at the time. They are comfortable, look much more "realistic" I can wear them for hours on end (I have) with no issues whatsoever. They fit so perfectly that I can drink and even eat some things with them in. One thing I will say about them though is that the dental putty that comes with them is crap. I used friendly plastic instead to mold them to my teeth and they lock in to the front teeth and stay in place very well, while staying loose enough that if I got popped in the mouth, they would come out and leave my teeth in my head. They're not too expensive and in my opinion worth every cent.
 

twilsemail

Artisan
Dom, I've seen discussions on those fangs before. The only complaint I heard was people having difficulty talking. Do you think this was beyond the normal difficulty people have while wearing tusks or was it just the general condition that is "tusk talk?"
 

Tyson

Scholar
Gettysburg Staff
I manage to avoid "tusk talk" by having my tusks formed around my lower lip as well. It's hard to explain in text, but I'll try until I can get a picture up.

After forming the teeth and attaching them to the center piece, you soften up the center to mold it around your gums/teeth. What I do is also dip the bottom half-inch or so of the teeth to make them soft too. Then when I mold the center piece, I also press my lower lip back against the teeth pieces. This makes a circular 'cut out' on my teeth where my bottom lip fits pretty comfortably within. (My tusks are also thicker from front to back than they are wide, so they are still strong with the lip cut-out.)

I'm able to close my lips together when talking which avoids a lot of the 'tusk talk'. It also means that I can keep my bottom lip from drying out due to air exposure. Which reminds me - bring some chapstick if your tusks are going to keep your lips apart all day.
 

Dom

Scout
Gettysburg Staff
With these teeth I actually find it easier to talk than with friendly plastic tusks. I do get tusk talk with them but that's a desired effect. My verbals come out clearly though.
 

DracoIam

Rogue

MaxIrons

Squire
Oregon Staff
Marshal
I've been searching like mad in the Eugene area and haven't found any. Had to order it online today in fact. :(
 
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