Humans Melt faces

As a player of fantasy LARPs since 1991, I've seen good and bad in costuming, role-playing, props and accessories. However, as many here seem to agree, I also prefer a well-dressed and propped NPC (or PC) to someone who simply doesn't have the desired equipment, or - in some regrettable cases- just doesn't give a damn! This attitude, unfortunately, ruins things for several players- and is a reason it should be avoided whenever possible (IMO). Low budgets, new players, and similar "real-world" limitations need to be overlooked, of course, but an experienced player wearing jeans and a Tshirt which says "Kiss me, I'm a Necromancer" on the front and "Yes, this IS my costume" REALLY put a damper on many of us and our enjoyment of the game (It was a different LARP system, but still)! Also, the reaction to a very-well costumed and propped NPC that walks into town is far more memorable than someone walking up and saying "I look like a very-well costumed and propped so-and-so", and - let's be honest- such memories are what makes events magical and talked about long after they're over!! :D

As for the "Human" thing (the original topic of this post), I actually enjoy being a "simple" race! Working in an environment where I have to put on a large amount of equipment and costuming means that playing a human is actually a blessing for me (what? I don't have to take a 1/2 hour or more getting into garb?! Awesome!!). Some of my character's in the past have required signifigant make-up and outfit preparations, so I do enjoy the immersion into your character that such things bring, but for now- Human, for me, is the way to go!

Besides- it makes me feel even more amused when I see the "Other-Race Fest" heading to the bathrooms every morning, or hear folks talk about how much spirit glue makes them itch! :cool:

but that's my Zwei Pfennig....
 
T. BrightMoore said:
As a player of fantasy LARPs since 1991, I've seen good and bad in costuming, role-playing, props and accessories. However, as many here seem to agree, I also prefer a well-dressed and propped NPC (or PC) to someone who simply doesn't have the desired equipment, or - in some regrettable cases- just doesn't give a damn! This attitude, unfortunately, ruins things for several players- and is a reason it should be avoided whenever possible (IMO). Low budgets, new players, and similar "real-world" limitations need to be overlooked, of course, but an experienced player wearing jeans and a Tshirt which says "Kiss me, I'm a Necromancer" on the front and "Yes, this IS my costume" REALLY put a damper on many of us and our enjoyment of the game (It was a different LARP system, but still)! Also, the reaction to a very-well costumed and propped NPC that walks into town is far more memorable than someone walking up and saying "I look like a very-well costumed and propped so-and-so", and - let's be honest- such memories are what makes events magical and talked about long after they're over!! :D

As for the "Human" thing (the original topic of this post), I actually enjoy being a "simple" race! Working in an environment where I have to put on a large amount of equipment and costuming means that playing a human is actually a blessing for me (what? I don't have to take a 1/2 hour or more getting into garb?! Awesome!!). Some of my character's in the past have required signifigant make-up and outfit preparations, so I do enjoy the immersion into your character that such things bring, but for now- Human, for me, is the way to go!

Besides- it makes me feel even more amused when I see the "Other-Race Fest" heading to the bathrooms every morning, or hear folks talk about how much spirit glue makes them itch! :cool:

but that's my Zwei Pfennig....
Bad costuming is a pet peeve of mine. Unless there are monetary concerns for the player there is simply no excuse for bad castuming. I like to go all out for my PCs (and NPCs when possible). I don't mind the morning and evening "Fest" heading to the bathrooms when I'm PCing. I will always do what is required when NPCing but am relieved when Humans are on the agenda because I know I won't be in and out of make-up all day. That's the only time I prefer human. One of my favorite NPCs that I've played is a human Squire from a Duchy neghboring Ashbury. His backstory and motivation were so well written that I was just able to dive in.

---Mike E.
 

Kauss

Fighter
Duke Frost said:
markusdark said:
Although not telling others how to run their games, I have found that creating stories and running plots with less fantastic monsters helps add to this a great deal. I don't write plots about griffons in mountain top caves because phys-repping a cave in a mountain, let alone a griffon, is difficult to say the least. The same exciting plot can be written involving a gypsy clan or a camp of bandits out in the forest.
We've been doing this more at HQ too.

Though we do have a mountaintop. We just need to dig the cave.

Alliance, and Nero beforehand, also had the precedent that certain huge monsters like dragons and griffons have a human sized and shaped form as well...though that is certainly not original to either larp and most likely originates from religion or mythology.

But these monsters are the exceptions and not the rule. Orc, goblins, undead, etc. (pretty much anything bipedal) are completely within the resources of any chapter. I'd rather fight decent looking orcs and goblins all day long than a lamely costumed NPC saying "I'm a dragon!".

NJ did a great job with their dragon, Eon Nanethul. He had cool blue prosthethics, was played by a very tall NPC wearing large shoulderpads under their tunic. He was hulking and intimidating. To me, that was a much better production than having say ten NPCs running around as a "segmented monster" saying they were a big dragon.

Scott
I dont know if we still have pics(we have changed the chapter web site since then) but the dragon we did here was a mix. It did take more than one person to play, but costume connected all the people and the head of the dragon was huge(dragon size, worn by a PC, teeth the size of daggers, the whole thng) and the body trailed off into a barn. It looked quite like the front part of a dragon with the rest hidden inside of something.
 
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