[.11] Poll : Reworking Resurrection

Should Permanent Death be removed from the game?


  • Total voters
    54

Tantarus

Squire
If someone wanted to do that in 1.3, it’s called Alchemy, the God of PvP.

It hasn’t been a problem yet, I don’t see why it would be a problem in the future, because that’s a culture issue, not a system issue.
I would more say it isnt a problem anymore... PVP was alot more common in the past. There is a reason in the 90s when I was a sarr I had 10 resist poisons.

That said I really dont see it making a massive comeback in the future either. Which is probably for the better.
 
I'm a new player. I've played two events and died at each of those events. I have, admittedly, gotten in over my head and reckless each of those times. But, to remove any significant risk from this game? I honestly wouldn't play any more. You died and lost some build? Or play time? Okay. You died your last time and had to roll a new character? That has some weight behind it. Especially if you died to save the town, or your friends. Death would have a lot less impact, if not meaningless, if it's effect was less severe.

Maybe it's because the only experience I've had with larp is those two sessions, plus a few podcasts of Empire Larp ( a British based festival larp) but I feel as though death should have MORE of an impact, not less. Yes, it sucks losing a character you have gotten attached to, a little piece of yourself. But, being able to try out new character concepts, new builds, new personalites, that's a lot of the fun of role-playing, in my opinion. I have a few ideas floating around in my head for my next three or four characters, and it excites me to be able to try them out.

And besides, it's not like you are forced to start out at level 1, or 2, or whatever we're going to call it. There is the option, if I recall correctly, to start off as a character at half your current build/XP if you draw a black stone, so not all is lost!

All in all, TL;DR: Perma is not all that bad, in my humble opinion.
 

Muir

Fighter
look
I'm a new player. I've played two events and died at each of those events. I have, admittedly, gotten in over my head and reckless each of those times. But, to remove any significant risk from this game? I honestly wouldn't play any more. You died and lost some build? Or play time? Okay. You died your last time and had to roll a new character? That has some weight behind it. Especially if you died to save the town, or your friends. Death would have a lot less impact, if not meaningless, if it's effect was less severe.

Maybe it's because the only experience I've had with larp is those two sessions, plus a few podcasts of Empire Larp ( a British based festival larp) but I feel as though death should have MORE of an impact, not less. Yes, it sucks losing a character you have gotten attached to, a little piece of yourself. But, being able to try out new character concepts, new builds, new personalites, that's a lot of the fun of role-playing, in my opinion. I have a few ideas floating around in my head for my next three or four characters, and it excites me to be able to try them out.

And besides, it's not like you are forced to start out at level 1, or 2, or whatever we're going to call it. There is the option, if I recall correctly, to start off as a character at half your current build/XP if you draw a black stone, so not all is lost!

All in all, TL;DR: Perma is not all that bad, in my humble opinion.
Not to be flip, but say that again in 5 or 10 years, when getting back to where you're at build wise is going to take dozens of events at $50+ a pop.

Under the new rules currently proposed, it won't be quite as bad as at present because scaling isn't going to be as utterly dependent on gear for a while until people figure out what is essential and scaling adjusts to consider it standard the way magic weapons, Arcane, and stacked item-based defenses are now.
 

Darkcrescent

Knight
Chicago Staff
Marshal
To be fair, there are plenty of ways to get up build wise without spending $50 a pop.

- NPC or donate for gobbies and blanket months or events in home or other chapters. No, this doesn’t require pouring a ton of cash to do so. Sew gear, make packets, write mods for some chapters. It’s common to say people have to pour in money but there are plenty of great alternatives to giving to this game and not unloading cash to help get a character higher build.

- We all got 2 free deaths to start, they are there specifically for learning from mistakes. We all make em, it’s the joy of early level newbie play.
 

MaxIrons

Squire
Oregon Staff
Marshal
To be fair, there are plenty of ways to get up build wise without spending $50 a pop.

- NPC or donate for gobbies and blanket months or events in home or other chapters. No, this doesn’t require pouring a ton of cash to do so. Sew gear, make packets, write mods for some chapters. It’s common to say people have to pour in money but there are plenty of great alternatives to giving to this game and not unloading cash to help get a character higher build.

- We all got 2 free deaths to start, they are there specifically for learning from mistakes. We all make em, it’s the joy of early level newbie play.
I want to echo this. I live paycheck to paycheck, yet I have gotten tens of thousands of goblin stamps over the years, and a nice bank of dragon stamps. I NPC'd -> NPC Guild -> Rules Marshal -> Ritual Marshal-> wrote lair cats for plot -> became plot -> became a nationals game plot -> am in the process of changeover to become head of plot. Between it all, by rough estimate I've averaged 10k GS a year. My costume is low cost.

All that said, I understand why losing a character is a big deal. It's not the money, it's that you are used to playing with a certain group of people, and if you perm out, unless you have been preparing for the eventuality (say allocating NPC blankets to a backup character in one chapter while playing in another), you aren't going to be able to do that.

It's why I said up above, although I would personally remove Regen, I get why it's there. It's the compromise. If a random bad pull would truly ruin your experience, here is an in game legal ritual so you don't have to worry about a bad pull. You still can't die endlessly, but you can better prepare for your character's upcoming demise if it comes to that. "Hey, guys, I've only got 3 regen charges left. If this thing throws oblits and one sticks; It's been great fighting with you. " You are mentally prepared, and can RP that fading light to a walk off into the sunset.
 

Draven

Count
Seattle Staff
Marshal
Edit: I was going to edit this to clarify my point, but then I thought about it, shrugged, and realized I’m not really interested in continuing in this thread anyways.
 
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Muir

Fighter
To be fair, there are plenty of ways to get up build wise without spending $50 a pop.

- NPC or donate for gobbies and blanket months or events in home or other chapters. No, this doesn’t require pouring a ton of cash to do so. Sew gear, make packets, write mods for some chapters. It’s common to say people have to pour in money but there are plenty of great alternatives to giving to this game and not unloading cash to help get a character higher build.

- We all got 2 free deaths to start, they are there specifically for learning from mistakes. We all make em, it’s the joy of early level newbie play.
Pretty well aware of that first. I've had tens of thousands of GS in various chapters over the years, and even if they were free (they very much aren't, trying to figure out what those donations actually cost in terms of hours of time invested is not a good look). Quick back of the envelope calculation with the alliance build calculator suggests that were I to retire my (very mid level in the midwest) Level 20 character it would take 92 blankets to get back to 20.

So if you play your main, and actually attend your home chapter's events, you can at best score 12 blankets a year there with GS in the place you are most likely to be able to get them without buying them, and buying them with cash is generally more efficient than with donations because there's no worries around shipping or supply and demand for the receiving chapter. Heck, the chapter we both play in wants a $15 membership fee to even receive blankets on a character housed there, regardless of where they're coming from.

Telling people to just npc if they want a bigger character is a huge red flag for something being broken, because we are outright telling someone that their best bet to get their character to place that is more fun to play is not to play the game.
 

Polare

Count
Alliance Rules
Moderator
Seattle Staff
Telling people to just npc if they want a bigger character is a huge red flag for something being broken, because we are outright telling someone that their best bet to get their character to place that is more fun to play is not to play the game.
If you consider NPCing "not playing the game", you may want to evaluate how you interact with NPCs and the entire setup. Some people prefer PCing. Some people prefer NPCing. A lot of people enjoy both. NPCing is absolutely a way to "play the game", however, and is incredibly valuable and important to Alliance - not just as a way to "play for cheap" but as a way to do something that a number of people prefer to PCing.

I must say that I find the insinuation that it is not "playing the game" somewhat disheartening and a touch insulting. It may not be the way *you* prefer to play the game, but I would recommend closely examining the way you think about Alliance if you feel that NPCing is not "playing the game".

-Bryan Gregory
ARC Chair
 

Naomi

Artisan
Telling people to just npc if they want a bigger character is a huge red flag for something being broken, because we are outright telling someone that their best bet to get their character to place that is more fun to play is not to play the game.
Yeah, a lot of people enjoy NPC'ing. It's also a great crash course to the game; you learn a lot of different skill quickly and you get to try a myriad of skills you wouldn't normally while PC'ing.
 

Muir

Fighter
If you consider NPCing "not playing the game", you may want to evaluate how you interact with NPCs and the entire setup. Some people prefer PCing. Some people prefer NPCing. A lot of people enjoy both. NPCing is absolutely a way to "play the game", however, and is incredibly valuable and important to Alliance - not just as a way to "play for cheap" but as a way to do something that a number of people prefer to PCing.

I must say that I find the insinuation that it is not "playing the game" somewhat disheartening and a touch insulting. It may not be the way *you* prefer to play the game, but I would recommend closely examining the way you think about Alliance if you feel that NPCing is not "playing the game".

-Bryan Gregory
ARC Chair
NPCing is good, and fun. It is also not playing your PC. It's a different way of engaging the game, with different challenges and benefits to the player, but it absolutely isn't playing the game as your PC.
 

Draven

Count
Seattle Staff
Marshal
NPCing is good, and fun. It is also not playing your PC. It's a different way of engaging the game, with different challenges and benefits to the player, but it absolutely isn't playing the game as your PC.
Sure, but it’s not really your place to say if that’s better or worse.
 

norman b

Squire
Marshal
Correct. A character would lose access to a skill/skills depending on level. However the same character wouldnt have a chance of being erased after dying. I'd say that's a pretty reasonable tradeoff. If your character died, youd lose 18 build under what I am proposing. Per current rules you could draw a black stone and lose 17 levels of build. Not to mention your current stories, friends and gear and garb you spent money on.
Flaw to this, you would be losing access to skills available mid game. Not like drain, but PERMANENT loss. It's a nightmare for players and for logistics. Also, if someone is unlucky and dies 10 times their first game, they would be at 14 build. That's more of a customer service issue than starting a new character.
 

Muir

Fighter
Sure, but it’s not really your place to say if that’s better or worse.
And you will note that I didn't do so. Not playing the game as a PC in no way implies a negative to NPCing, and I am very curious why you would read one in.

The point of the statement is that if the design intent of the xp system is to reward character advancement for playing the character, putting a player in a position where the answer is to not play the character implies a design issue.
 
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